Aspirin, salicylate, sulfite and tartrazine induced bronchoconstriction. Safe doses and case definition in epidemiological studies

J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Oct;48(10):1269-75. doi: 10.1016/0895-4356(95)00017-x.

Abstract

Allergic-like reactions to chemical components of foods and medicines may be common. The prevalence of idiosyncratic reactions to aspirin, salicylate, metabisulfite and tartrazine is not known. We used a tertiary referral clinic population to estimate safe exposure doses for epidemiological studies. A 15% decrease in the amount of air expired in one second was defined a positive response. The median effective molar doses of the agents were remarkably similar: metabisulfite 0.19 mM, 34.4 mg [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14, 0.27 mM]; tartrazine 0.10 M, 55.0 mg (95% CI 0.05, 0.21 mM); aspirin 0.09 mM, 16.5 mg (95% CI 0.04, 0.19 mM); and salicylate 0.11 mM, 15.3 mg (95% CI 0.05, 0.27 mM). Doses to which the most sensitive (5%) and practically all (95%) susceptible persons might respectively respond are: metabisulfite 4.6 mg, 255.8 mg; tartrazine 3.4 mg, 885.6 mg; aspirin 0.8 mg, 332.3 mg; and salicylate 2.6 mg, 89.9 mg. Doses within these ranges can be used in epidemiological studies.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Aspirin* / adverse effects
  • Bronchoconstriction / drug effects*
  • Drug Hypersensitivity / diagnosis*
  • Drug Hypersensitivity / etiology
  • Drug Hypersensitivity / physiopathology
  • Environmental Exposure
  • Epidemiologic Methods
  • False Positive Reactions
  • Female
  • Forced Expiratory Volume / drug effects
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Salicylates* / adverse effects
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Sulfites* / adverse effects
  • Tartrazine* / adverse effects

Substances

  • Salicylates
  • Sulfites
  • metabisulfite
  • Tartrazine
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Aspirin