Hepatitis B virus infection in high-risk inner-city neighborhoods in San Francisco

Hepatology. 1995 Jul;22(1):44-9.

Abstract

To examine the extent of hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) in an inner-city community, we determined the prevalence, incidence, and correlates of HBV seroreactivity in a representative sample of unmarried whites, African-Americans, and Hispanics living in San Francisco during 1988 to 1989 and again 1 year later in 1989 to 1990. Unmarried men and women aged 20 to 44 years were surveyed in a random household sample drawn from three neighborhoods of varying geographic and cultural characteristics. Hepatitis B infection was determined by testing specimens for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Of blood samples available from 1,108 participants from the initial survey, 159 (14%) were anti-HBc positive. There was a strong positive association between anti-HBc positivity and positive serological tests for human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus type 2, and syphilis. In women and heterosexual men, after controlling for other variables, anti-HBc positivity was significantly associated with older age (P < .001), nonwhite ethnicity (P < .01), less education (P < .05), injection drug use (P < .001), being paid for sex (P < .05), and lifetime number of sexual partners (P < .05). Among homosexually active men, after controlling for other variables, anti-HBc positivity was significantly associated with nonwhite ethnicity (P < .001), injection drug use in a sexual partner (P < .05), and number of lifetime sexual partners (P < .05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Female
  • Hepatitis B / epidemiology*
  • Hepatitis B / ethnology
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • San Francisco / epidemiology
  • Sexual Partners
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases / epidemiology
  • Urban Health*