Effects of ethnicity on low-dose opiate stabilization

J Subst Abuse Treat. Mar-Apr 1995;12(2):111-6. doi: 10.1016/0740-5472(94)00069-4.

Abstract

In a recent randomized clinical trial using buprenorphine (2 and 6 mg) and methadone (35 and 65 mg), we compared low-level opiate withdrawal symptoms among Whites (n = 84), Hispanics (n = 20), and African Americans (n = 21). During the first 2 months of opiate stabilization, persistent low-level opiate withdrawal symptoms were significantly lower in African-Americans and Hispanics than in the white patients. As expected pharmacologically, this relative underreporting of low-level withdrawal by minority patients was greater for the low opiate doses (buprenorphine 2 mg and methadone 35 mg). This underreporting may reflect sociocultural as well as biological differences, because subjective, but not objective, withdrawal symptoms showed this ethnic difference.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans* / psychology
  • Buprenorphine / administration & dosage*
  • Buprenorphine / adverse effects
  • Cross-Cultural Comparison
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Drug Administration Schedule
  • European Continental Ancestry Group* / psychology
  • Female
  • Hispanic Americans* / psychology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Methadone / administration & dosage*
  • Methadone / adverse effects
  • Neurologic Examination / drug effects
  • Opioid-Related Disorders / ethnology
  • Opioid-Related Disorders / psychology
  • Opioid-Related Disorders / rehabilitation*
  • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / diagnosis
  • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / ethnology*
  • Treatment Outcome

Substances

  • Buprenorphine
  • Methadone