Hospitalizations for near drowning in California: incidence and costs

Am J Public Health. 1995 Aug;85(8 Pt 1):1115-8. doi: 10.2105/ajph.85.8_pt_1.1115.

Abstract

California hospital discharge data for 1991 were examined to describe persons hospitalized for near drownings (i.e., a submersion incident for which the victim was admitted to a hospital). Among residents with near-drowning injuries, there were 865 discharges, regardless of outcome (rate = 2.8/100,000); 785 persons survived the hospitalization, and 80 (9%) did not. Swimming pools were the most common submersion site (62%). Highest rates per 100,000 were found among males (3.6), Blacks (3.6), and children 1 through 5 years old (18.4). Charges for the initial hospitalization (excluding physicians' fees) amounted to $11.4 million. The state government's share of these charges was $5.4 million, with Medi-Cal expected to pay $4.1 million. Blacks, males, Medi-Cal recipients, and young children are most at risk and should be targeted for prevention programs.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Baths
  • California / epidemiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Emergency Service, Hospital / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Hospital Charges*
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Infant
  • Insurance, Health
  • Male
  • Near Drowning / economics
  • Near Drowning / epidemiology*
  • Near Drowning / mortality
  • Patient Admission / statistics & numerical data
  • Patient Discharge / statistics & numerical data
  • Swimming Pools