Juvenile myasthenia gravis with predominant facial weakness in a 7-year-old boy

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1995 May;32(2):167-9. doi: 10.1016/0165-5876(94)01114-d.

Abstract

Myasthenia gravis is the most prevalent of the diseases of the neuromuscular junction in children. The most common clinical finding is ptosis, although ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness are commonly present. This paper reports juvenile myasthenia gravis in a 7-year-old boy with predominant facial muscle weakness without ophthalmoplegia and ptosis. This was detected post-operatively after adenotonsillectomy, as there was severe respiratory distress. Prompt diagnosis and treatment was life saving. A CT scan of the chest revealed thymoma. After the surgical removal of the thymoma, the child has been followed up for a year and is asymptomatic.

Publication types

  • Case Reports

MeSH terms

  • Adenoidectomy
  • Adenoids / physiopathology
  • Adenoids / surgery
  • Child
  • Facial Muscles / physiopathology
  • Facial Paralysis / complications*
  • Facial Paralysis / physiopathology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Myasthenia Gravis / complications*
  • Myasthenia Gravis / diagnosis*
  • Palatine Tonsil / physiopathology
  • Palatine Tonsil / surgery
  • Respiratory Insufficiency / complications
  • Respiratory Insufficiency / physiopathology
  • Respiratory Insufficiency / surgery
  • Respiratory Muscles / physiopathology
  • Thymectomy
  • Thymoma / diagnosis
  • Thymoma / pathology
  • Thymoma / surgery
  • Thymus Gland / pathology
  • Thymus Gland / surgery
  • Thymus Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • Thymus Neoplasms / pathology
  • Thymus Neoplasms / surgery
  • Tomography, X-Ray Computed
  • Tonsillectomy