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. 1993;108(3):76-7, 89.

[Voluntary HIV Testing in Iceland. Infection Risk Factors and Prevalence of Antibodies Against HIV, Hepatitis B and C Viruses]

[Article in Swedish]
Affiliations
  • PMID: 7681163

[Voluntary HIV Testing in Iceland. Infection Risk Factors and Prevalence of Antibodies Against HIV, Hepatitis B and C Viruses]

[Article in Swedish]
G J Snorrason et al. Nord Med. .

Abstract

Subjects attending a semi-anonymous HIV testing site at Borgarspitalinn, Reykjavik, during a five year period (1987-1992) were asked to complete a questionnaire on several factors associated with increased risk of HIV infection and the reason for their request of being tested. Serum samples from the subjects were tested for antibodies against HIV, HBV and HCV. During the study period 475 sets of tests were performed on a total of 400 individuals. Three-hundred thirty six individuals returned 401 questionnaires. Sexual contact with prostitutes was reported by 30 males (in 40 instances) and one female: and 40 males (in 47 instances) and 18 females indicated promiscuous sexual behaviour. Homosexuality was reported by 15 males and one female. Seven individuals requested testing due to previous blood transfusion and 5 reported i.v. drug abuse. A request from a third party (significant other, insurance company, etc.) was stated by 32 subjects. Two of the 400 subjects tested were HIV-positive (0.5 per cent), and 9 (2.3 per cent) and 11 (2.8 per cent) were found to have markers for HBV and HCV infection, respectively. A significant correlation was observed between HIV infection and homosexuality (P < 0.05) and between HCV infection and i.v. drug abuse (p < 0.01). Overall, a total of 136 subjects (41 per cent) in the study reported behaviour associated with increased risk of HIV infection. This information supports the continued role of a semi-anonymous HIV testing site among the services offered by the health care system during the AIDS epidemic.

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