Longitudinal assessment of growth in children born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus infection

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995 May;149(5):497-502. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170180027004.

Abstract

Objectives: To describe and to evaluate the longitudinal growth of children born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

Design: Measurements of weight, length (measured in infants in a recumbent position) and height (measured in older children in an upright position), and head circumference were documented and evaluated longitudinally using generalized estimating equations in a group of children born to HIV-infected mothers. Children infected with HIV were compared with uninfected children and with National Center for Health Statistics standards.

Setting: Primary care clinic in an urban hospital devoted to the medical care of children born to HIV-infected mothers.

Patients: One hundred nine children born to HIV-infected mothers, 59 HIV-infected and 50 uninfected, between birth and 70 months of age.

Results: The mean birth weights of both groups were below the 50th percentile. While the mean weight-for-age curve of uninfected children attained the 50th percentile by age 24 months, the mean birth weight-for-age curve of HIV-infected children remained below the 50th percentile. Weight gain became significantly different between the two groups by age 36 months. The mean birth length-for-age curves of HIV-infected and uninfected children was also below the 50th percentile. The mean height-for-age curve of uninfected children attained the 50th percentile by age 40 months, while that of HIV-infected children remained well below the 50th percentile. Linear growth between HIV-infected and uninfected children diverged earlier than weight, becoming significantly different by age 15 months.

Conclusions: Although children born to HIV-infected mothers are born with weight and length below the 50th percentile, uninfected children catch up, while HIV-infected children remain below the 50th percentile and experience an earlier and more pronounced decrease in linear growth (height-for-age) than in weight-for-age.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Body Height / physiology
  • Body Weight / physiology
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Growth / physiology*
  • HIV Infections / physiopathology*
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Mothers*