The production and use of an attitudinal film in birth control education

J Sch Health. 1978 May;48(5):307-10. doi: 10.1111/j.1746-1561.1978.tb03821.x.

Abstract

In order to help improve the effectiveness of birth control education programs, a film "It Couldn't Happen to Me" was produced focusing on the psychological motives involved in the non-use of birth control among teenagers. Preliminary evaluation of the film took place with five sample groups: high school students, university students, nursing students, health educators, and Planned Parenthood workers. Survey results indicate that the film is relevant for each of these groups. Pre and posttest measures of the attitudes of the university and nursing samples indicate that the film makes viewers more aware of the psychological factors involved in the non-use of birth control.

PIP: A film entitled, "It Couldn't Happen to Me" was produced, focusing on the psychological motives involved in the nonuse of birth control among teenagers. The film was then shown to and evaluated by 5 sample groups in Ontario, Canada: 1) 166 high school students in grades 11-13; 2, 57 university students taking a second-year course in a Department of Family Studies; 3) 39 second-year student nurses; 4) 19 representatives attending a Provincial Planned Parenthood Conference; and 5) 34 health educators attending a 1-week sex education workshop at a university. All the groups indicated that the film was relevant for presenting real situations to them openly and honestly. However, pretest and posttest measures show that some attitudes remained unaffected by the film. 84% of the respondents rejected the notion that increased moral standards would decrease adolescent pregnancy rates, and 90% agreed that any girl is entitled to information and help. Also, as the goal of not becoming pregnant can presuppose the act of premarital intercourse, competition arises for values such as the belief in virginity at marriage. Also, 80% of the respondents agreed with the statement concerning fear of going to a doctor or druggist out of fear of discovery. Thus, while this film should make viewers more aware of the psychological factors involved in nonuse of birth control, health educators should consider the discrepancies of values in planning future interventions.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Audiovisual Aids*
  • Contraception
  • Family Planning Services*
  • Female
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Humans
  • Pregnancy
  • Psychology
  • Sex Education*