The hydrophobic barrier properties of gastrointestinal mucus

Annu Rev Physiol. 1995;57:565-83. doi: 10.1146/annurev.ph.57.030195.003025.

Abstract

Impressive evidence has accumulated over the past 12 years indicating that one of the potentially important biophysical characteristics of mucus relates to its hydrophobic character. This surface property is region specific and reaches high values in the stomach and colon, where barrier properties against noxious agents in the lumen are most important. The hydrophobic properties of mucus appear to be related to its lipidic constituents and specifically to the presence of phospholipid surfactants that are synthesized, stored, and secreted by GI mucus cells in a regulated fashion.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Digestive System Physiological Phenomena*
  • Gastric Mucosa / chemistry
  • Gastric Mucosa / cytology
  • Gastric Mucosa / physiology
  • Glycoproteins / chemistry
  • Helicobacter Infections / physiopathology
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Humans
  • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
  • Intestinal Mucosa / chemistry
  • Intestinal Mucosa / physiology
  • Lipid Metabolism
  • Lipids / chemistry
  • Mucus / chemistry*
  • Mucus / physiology
  • Peptic Ulcer / physiopathology
  • Phospholipids / metabolism
  • Phospholipids / therapeutic use
  • Sialic Acids / metabolism
  • Surface-Active Agents / chemistry
  • Surface-Active Agents / metabolism

Substances

  • Glycoproteins
  • Lipids
  • Phospholipids
  • Sialic Acids
  • Surface-Active Agents