Percutaneous recanalization of recent renal artery occlusions: report of 10 cases

Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. Sep-Oct 1994;17(5):258-63. doi: 10.1007/BF00192448.

Abstract

Purpose: Percutaneous recanalization of renal artery occlusion was attempted in 10 patients.

Methods: All patients were hypertensive; before the procedure, the serum creatinine level was 80 mumol/L in one patient, ranged from 130-250 mumol/L in four patients, and was greater than 350 mumol/L in five, three of whom had anuria. Nine occlusions were thrombotic, one due to bilateral renal artery embolism. In four patients, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of a contralateral renal artery occlusion was bilateral. In three patients, complementary local fibrinolysis was necessary.

Results: Three technical failures and one rethrombosis occurred after 24 h; in three of these cases the date of previous occlusion was unknown, whereas a relatively precise data was known for the seven other patients. One false aneurysm of the femoral artery was found 1 month after the procedure. One patient, after six technical successes, died 5 weeks after the procedure; follow-up for the other five was 6-36 months. Blood pressure was unchanged in four patients and improved in two. A significant and durable improvement of creatinine serum level (at least a 20% decrease) was observed in all six patients, usually after 1 month, thus enabling discontinuance of dialysis in three patients.

Conclusion: Percutaneous recanalization should be proposed in cases of renal artery occlusion, especially to avoid terminal vascular azotemia and dialysis.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Angioplasty, Balloon*
  • Catheterization*
  • Embolism / diagnostic imaging
  • Embolism / therapy*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Punctures
  • Radiography
  • Renal Artery / diagnostic imaging
  • Renal Artery Obstruction / diagnostic imaging
  • Renal Artery Obstruction / therapy*
  • Thrombosis / diagnostic imaging
  • Thrombosis / therapy*