Implications of the SNARE hypothesis for intracellular membrane topology and dynamics

Curr Biol. 1994 Mar 1;4(3):220-33. doi: 10.1016/s0960-9822(00)00051-8.

Abstract

The SNARE hypothesis provides a mechanism for the specific docking and fusion of transport vesicles with their target membranes. A simple extension of the hypothesis can explain many cellular processes, including the stacking of Golgi cisternae, retrograde transport and homotypic fusion; it can also explain the morphology of intracellular membranes and their dynamics during mitosis.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Carrier Proteins / physiology
  • GTP-Binding Proteins / physiology
  • Golgi Apparatus / physiology
  • Intracellular Membranes / physiology*
  • Intracellular Membranes / ultrastructure
  • Membrane Fusion / physiology
  • Membrane Proteins / physiology
  • Mitosis / physiology
  • Models, Biological*
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins / physiology
  • R-SNARE Proteins
  • Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Proteins
  • Vesicular Transport Proteins*

Substances

  • Carrier Proteins
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins
  • R-SNARE Proteins
  • Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Proteins
  • Vesicular Transport Proteins
  • GTP-Binding Proteins