Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
. 1993 Dec;8(4):308-24.

Selective Decontamination of the Digestive Tract: Risks Outweigh Benefits for Intensive Care Unit Patients

Affiliations
  • PMID: 7938928
Review

Selective Decontamination of the Digestive Tract: Risks Outweigh Benefits for Intensive Care Unit Patients

R A Duncan et al. Semin Respir Infect. .

Abstract

Selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) involves the administration of non-absorbable antibiotics (+/- a systemic antibiotic) to prevent colonization and infection in intensive care unit patients. The regimen is targeted at nosocomial gram-negative bacilli, some gram-positive bacteria and yeast. Although all studies of SDD have demonstrated reduced rates of bacterial colonization and most yielded lower respiratory tract infection, it is unclear if the major impact of SDD is on pneumonia or tracheobronchitis. SDD regimens utilizing a broad spectrum, systemic antibiotic appear to be more effective, suggesting that this constitutes early treatment rather than prophylaxis. To date, there is conflicting evidence that SDD significantly reduces length of stay, mortality, or hospital costs. Currently, there are concerns that SDD may result in increased colonization and infection with gram-positive organisms and multi-drug resistant pathogens, particularly in medical ICU patients or when used for extended periods of time.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

MeSH terms

Substances

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback