No-show patients in an ophthalmological out-patient department

Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1994 Jun;72(3):284-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-3768.1994.tb02760.x.

Abstract

Information on no-show patients in an ophthalmological out-patient department was collected and analyzed during one month in 1992 and compared to one month in 1993, after the introduction of a new policy of allocating fines to those patients who did not show for their appointments. In October 1992, 118 patients (6.4% out of 1837 scheduled appointments) and in 1993, 94 patients (5.5% out of 1710 appointments) did not show for the appointment. The strabismus unit showed the highest percentage of no-show patients for both years (8.4% in 1992, 7.5% in 1993) and the low vision unit the lowest (4.6% in 1992, 4.1% in 1993). In 1992, Tuesday (8.9%), and in 1993 Monday (6.9%) were the weekdays with the highest percentages; the lowest was Wednesday (4.4% in 1992, 2.8% in 1993). By appointment type, consultations from other clinics had the highest percentage in both years (7.9% in 1992, 6.9% in 1993) while the lowest was visits to personnel other than a doctor (3.7% in both years). The age group 31-40 years had the most no-show patients in both years (10.9% in 1992, 10.2% in 1993). The lowest percentage was in the age group 61-80 years (2.6-4.9% in 1992, 3.0-2.7% in 1993). To minimize broken appointments, it is important to inform the patient well about his disease and the significance of the examinations and follow-up visits. As an economical result of the no-show patients, a calculated income equivalent to the salary of about 3 persons in the nursing staff was lost.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Appointments and Schedules*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Hospital Departments / statistics & numerical data*
  • Hospitals, University
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Ophthalmology / trends*
  • Outpatient Clinics, Hospital / statistics & numerical data*
  • Patient Compliance
  • Patient Dropouts*