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, 52 (4), 835-40

Association of the Widespread A149P Hereditary Fructose Intolerance Mutation With Newly Identified Sequence Polymorphisms in the Aldolase B Gene

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Association of the Widespread A149P Hereditary Fructose Intolerance Mutation With Newly Identified Sequence Polymorphisms in the Aldolase B Gene

C C Brooks et al. Am J Hum Genet.

Abstract

Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal autosomal recessive disease resulting from the catalytic deficiency of fructose 1-phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) in fructose-metabolizing tissues. The A149P mutation in exon 5 of the aldolase B gene, located on chromosome 9q21.3-q22.2, is widespread and the most common HFI mutation, accounting for 57% of HFI chromosomes. The possible origin of this mutation was studied by linkage to polymorphisms within the aldolase B gene. DNA fragments of the aldolase B gene containing the polymorphic marker loci from HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele were amplified by PCR. Absolute linkage to a common PvuII RFLP allele was observed in 10 A149P homozygotes. In a more informative study, highly heterozygous polymorphisms were detected by direct sequence determination of a PCR-amplified aldolase B gene fragment. Two two-allele, single-base-pair polymorphisms, themselves in absolute linkage disequilibrium, in intron 8 (C at nucleotide 84 and A at nucleotide 105, or T at 84 and G at 105) of the aldolase B gene were identified. Mendelian segregation of these polymorphisms was confirmed in three families. Allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridizations with probes for both sequence polymorphisms showed that 47% of 32 unrelated individuals were heterozygous at these loci; the calculated PIC value was .37. Finally, ASO hybridizations of PCR-amplified DNA from 15 HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele with probes for these sequence polymorphisms revealed absolute linkage disequilibrium between the A149P mutation and the 84T/105G allele. These results are consistent with a single origin of the A149P allele and subsequent spread by genetic drift.

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