Storage of poultry meat under modified atmospheres or vacuum packs: possible role of microbial metabolites as indicator of spoilage

J Appl Bacteriol. 1994 Feb;76(2):163-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.1994.tb01612.x.

Abstract

The effect of carbon dioxide (100%), nitrogen (100%), carbon dioxide/oxygen (20%:80%) or vacuum pack at 3 and 10 degrees C was studied on the microbial flora, in skinless poultry breast fillets or thigh meat. Lactic acid bacteria and Brochothrix thermosphacta were the predominant organisms in samples stored in vacuum packs, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Pseudomonads grew only in oxygen/carbon dioxide packaging systems. The concentration of lactate diminished in both thigh and breast meat during storage at 3 and 10 degrees C. This decrease was more pronounced in thigh meat stored under 20%:80% carbon dioxide/oxygen. Acetate increased to varying degrees in all samples regardless of the storage conditions.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Acetates / metabolism*
  • Acetic Acid
  • Animals
  • Atmosphere*
  • Carbon Dioxide
  • Chickens
  • Food Handling / methods*
  • Food Microbiology*
  • Gram-Positive Bacteria / metabolism*
  • Nitrogen
  • Oxygen
  • Poultry Products / microbiology*

Substances

  • Acetates
  • Carbon Dioxide
  • Nitrogen
  • Acetic Acid
  • Oxygen