Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 1994 May 25;271(20):1602-5.

Adverse Events Associated With Childhood Vaccines Other Than Pertussis and Rubella. Summary of a Report From the Institute of Medicine

Affiliations
  • PMID: 8182813

Adverse Events Associated With Childhood Vaccines Other Than Pertussis and Rubella. Summary of a Report From the Institute of Medicine

K R Stratton et al. JAMA. .

Abstract

In September 1993, the Institute of Medicine released a report entitled Adverse Events Associated With Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality. The report examined putative serious adverse consequences associated with administration of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids; measles, mumps, and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines; oral polio vaccine and inactivated polio vaccine; hepatitis B vaccines; and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines. The committee spent 18 months reviewing all available scientific and medical data, from individual case reports (published and unpublished) to controlled clinical trials. The committee found that the evidence favored the rejection of a causal relation between diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and sudden infant death syndrome, and between conjugate Hib vaccines and susceptibility to Hib disease. The committee found that the evidence favored acceptance of a causal relation between diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and Guillain-Barré syndrome and brachial neuritis, between measles vaccine and anaphylaxis, between oral polio vaccine and Guillain-Barré syndrome, and between unconjugated Hib vaccine and susceptibility to Hib disease. The committee found that the evidence established causality between diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and anaphylaxis, between measles vaccine and death from measles vaccine-strain viral infection, between measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and thrombocytopenia and anaphylaxis, between oral polio vaccine and poliomyelitis and death from polio vaccine-strain viral infection, and between hepatitis B vaccine and anaphylaxis. For five vaccine-related adverse events, there was no evidence identified. For the remaining 33 vaccine-related adverse events, the evidence was inadequate to accept or reject a causal relation.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 17 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

MeSH terms

Feedback