Drug abuse in an obstetric population of a midsized city

South Med J. 1993 Dec;86(12):1334-8. doi: 10.1097/00007611-199312000-00002.

Abstract

Drug abuse during pregnancy has attracted national attention, but most studies are from large cities. This study is concerned with the indigent pregnant patients in a midsized city in the southeastern United States. In a 23-month study, 2,442 patients were delivered of neonates. Using specific criteria, 511 patients were tested for drug abuse. A positive test was identified in 156 (31%), cocaine being the most common agent. During 2 months of random testing, 15 patients (16%) had positive drug screens. Comparison of drug-positive pregnant patients with general obstetric patients identified many adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome data. Drug-positive patients weighed less, were older, were prone to not seek prenatal care, and were more likely to deliver prematurely and have a growth-retarded infant. Drug abuse in this population had significant impact on the health of the patient and her unborn infant.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Amphetamine
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Cannabis
  • Cocaine
  • Female
  • Georgia / epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Illicit Drugs*
  • Narcotics
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Complications / epidemiology*
  • Pregnancy Outcome
  • Prenatal Care
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • Substance Abuse Detection
  • Substance Abuse, Intravenous / epidemiology
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology*
  • Substance-Related Disorders / urine

Substances

  • Barbiturates
  • Illicit Drugs
  • Narcotics
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine