Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Increased Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding in Offspring at 3 and 6 Months of Age

Brain Res Bull. 1994;33(2):223-4. doi: 10.1016/0361-9230(94)90256-9.

Abstract

Prior studies indicate that prenatal cocaine exposure can alter dopamine transporter binding in mature mice. To determine the persistence of these effects, pregnant mice were treated with cocaine, 10 mg/kg/d, during days 13 to 20 of gestation and dopamine transporter binding was evaluated in offspring at 3 and 6 months of age. In contrast to prior studies, binding in striatum was significantly increased at both time points in cocaine-exposed mice compared to controls.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Animals, Newborn
  • Carrier Proteins / drug effects*
  • Carrier Proteins / metabolism*
  • Cocaine / pharmacology*
  • Corpus Striatum / drug effects*
  • Corpus Striatum / metabolism*
  • Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
  • Female
  • Membrane Glycoproteins*
  • Membrane Transport Proteins*
  • Mice
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins*
  • Pregnancy
  • Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects*

Substances

  • Carrier Proteins
  • Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
  • Membrane Glycoproteins
  • Membrane Transport Proteins
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins
  • Cocaine