Estimating body composition of young children by using bioelectrical resistance

J Appl Physiol (1985). 1993 Oct;75(4):1776-80. doi: 10.1152/jappl.1993.75.4.1776.

Abstract

It is currently unclear whether age-specific equations should be used for assessing body composition from bioelectrical resistance. Kushner et al. (Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 56: 835-839, 1992) showed that the relationship between height2/resistance and total body water (TBW) is robust across a wide age range, although uncertainty remained over the relationship in preschool children. We therefore cross-validated the Kushner equation for predicting total body water in 4- to 6-yr-old children in two independent laboratories. TBW was measured from H2 18O dilution, and bioelectrical resistance and reactance were measured using an RJL 101A analyzer in 31 children (15 females, 16 males; 5 +/- 0.8 yr) studied in Burlington, Vermont, and 30 children (14 females, 16 males; 5 +/- 0.2 yr) studied in Phoenix, Arizona. There was no significant difference between TBW predicted from the Kushner equation and that measured in children in Burlington (11.76 +/- 2.00 vs. 11.91 +/- 2.46 kg; r = 0.94) or in Phoenix (11.53 +/- 1.64 vs. 11.66 +/- 1.90 kg; r = 0.94). The Kushner equation for TBW can be transformed into an equation for fat-free mass (FFM) by using published age- and gender-specific constants for the hydration of FFM: hydration of FFM = 76.9 - 0.25 age (yr) - 1.9 gender where female equals 0 and male equals 1. The intraclass reliability for estimates of fat mass and FFM with the use of bioelectrical resistance in an independent group of 26 children (5.0 +/- 0.8 yr, 20.2 +/- 3.0 kg) was > 0.99 for duplicate observations performed 2 wk apart.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Arizona
  • Body Composition*
  • Body Water / physiology
  • Child
  • Electric Impedance*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Oxygen Radioisotopes
  • Sex Characteristics
  • Vermont

Substances

  • Oxygen Radioisotopes