Weight control practices of lightweight football players

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Jun;25(6):694-701.

Abstract

The objective of this research was to investigate the weight control practices of lightweight football players. In addition, the importance of several variables was examined for their clinical importance and ability to identify individuals at high risk for pathogenic eating behaviors. Male college lightweight football players (N = 131) were administered a 45-item version of the Diagnostic Survey For Eating Disorders (9). Results revealed that 74% had experienced binge eating, and 17% had experienced self-induced vomiting. During the month preceding questionnaire administration, 66% had fasted, nearly 4% had used laxatives, while less than 2.5% had used diet pills, diuretics, or enemas for the purpose of weight control. Furthermore, the "teacher/coach" seemed to be the individual who motivated dieting behavior, and more than 20% of the sample reported that their weight control practices interfered with their thoughts and extracurricular activities "often" or "always." Most importantly, 42% of the sample evidenced a pattern of dysfunctional eating, while 9.9% of the sample engaged in binge-purge behavior to the degree that it might represent an eating disorder. Finally, discriminant the degree that it might represent an eating disorder. Finally, discriminant analysis yielded several variables that might be useful in identifying individuals at risk for pathogenic eating behaviors.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Appetite Depressants / therapeutic use
  • Body Composition
  • Body Height
  • Body Mass Index
  • Body Weight
  • Cathartics / therapeutic use
  • Diuretics / therapeutic use
  • Enema
  • Exercise
  • Fasting
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders / diagnosis
  • Football*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Risk Factors
  • Self Concept
  • Substance-Related Disorders / diagnosis
  • Vomiting / diagnosis
  • Weight Loss / physiology*

Substances

  • Appetite Depressants
  • Cathartics
  • Diuretics