Transcriptional antitermination

Nature. 1993 Jul 29;364(6436):401-6. doi: 10.1038/364401a0.

Abstract

Antiterminator proteins control gene expression by recognizing control signals near the promoter and preventing transcriptional termination which would otherwise occur at sites that may be a long way downstream. The N protein of bacteriophage lambda recognizes a sequence in the nascent RNA, and modifies RNA polymerase by catalysing the formation of a stable ribonucleoprotein complex on its surface, whereas the lambda Q protein recognizes a sequence in the DNA. These mechanisms of antitermination in lambda provide models for analysing antitermination in viruses such as HIV-1 and in eukaryotic genes.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Bacteriophage lambda / genetics
  • Base Sequence
  • Gene Products, tat / physiology
  • HIV-1 / genetics
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Transcription, Genetic / physiology*
  • Viral Proteins / physiology
  • Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins / physiology*
  • tat Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Substances

  • Gene Products, tat
  • N protein, Bacteriophage lambda
  • Q protein, Bacteriophage lambda
  • Viral Proteins
  • Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins
  • tat Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus