The president's child immunization initiative--a summary of the problem and the response

Public Health Rep. Jul-Aug 1993;108(4):419-25.

Abstract

After only 24 days in office, President Bill Clinton announced a comprehensive childhood immunization initiative designed to assure that all children in the United States lead healthier lives by receiving age-appropriate immunizations against preventable diseases such as polio, mumps, measles, whooping cough, and diphtheria. As part of his economic stimulus proposal, the President requested $300 million for Fiscal Year 1993 to reinforce the nation's immunization infrastructure by providing funding for communities to extend clinic hours, provide more staff, and increase information and education efforts and for the planning and implementation of a national immunization tracking system. In its Fiscal 1994 budget request, the Administration asked for a doubling of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's immunization program funding to $667 million. In cooperation with key congressional committees, the Administration has also prepared legislation that would provide recommended childhood vaccines to States for free distribution to health care providers who serve children enrolled in Medicaid or who don't have health insurance that covers immunization services. Providers could not charge for the vaccine but could charge a fee for administration. State Medicaid programs would also be required to reimburse providers reasonably for vaccine administration. This measure is designed to improve universal access to immunization services by helping to remove financial barriers that impede children from being immunized at the appropriate age.

MeSH terms

  • Child
  • Child Health Services* / legislation & jurisprudence
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Health Policy*
  • Health Services Accessibility
  • Humans
  • Preventive Health Services
  • United States
  • Vaccination* / economics
  • Vaccination* / legislation & jurisprudence