Prenatal care and drug use in pregnant women

Drug Alcohol Depend. 1993 Jun;33(1):1-9. doi: 10.1016/0376-8716(93)90027-n.

Abstract

This case-control study tested the hypothesis that pregnant inner-city women with low utilization of prenatal care are likely to be frequent drug users. Cases registered consecutively for prenatal care at > or = 28 weeks gestation or had < 4 prenatal visits. Controls were matched to cases by date of delivery. 24/81 (30%) cases and 16/128 (12%) controls were frequent drug users (adjusted odds ratio = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.4). Drug use (P = 0.01) and socioeconomic status (P = 0.001) were significantly correlated with prenatal care utilization. Self-report alone failed to note as many drug users as toxicology screen alone. Both substance use history and toxicology screen are advisable in women with low utilization of prenatal care.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Alcoholism / epidemiology
  • Alcoholism / rehabilitation
  • Baltimore / epidemiology
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Illicit Drugs* / adverse effects
  • Incidence
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome / prevention & control
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Outcome
  • Prenatal Care*
  • Psychotropic Drugs* / adverse effects
  • Substance Abuse Detection
  • Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology*
  • Substance-Related Disorders / rehabilitation
  • Urban Population*

Substances

  • Illicit Drugs
  • Psychotropic Drugs