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, 8 (5), 1377-84

Two Potentially Oncogenic Cyclins, Cyclin A and Cyclin D1, Share Common Properties of Subunit Configuration, Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Physical Association With the Rb Protein

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  • PMID: 8479754

Two Potentially Oncogenic Cyclins, Cyclin A and Cyclin D1, Share Common Properties of Subunit Configuration, Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Physical Association With the Rb Protein

F L Hall et al. Oncogene.

Abstract

Originally identified as a 'mitotic cyclin', cyclin A exhibits properties of growth factor sensitivity, susceptibility to viral subversion and association with a tumor-suppressor protein, properties which are indicative of an S-phase-promoting factor (SPF) as well as a candidate proto-oncogene. Other recent studies have identified human cyclin D1 (PRAD1) as a putative G1 cyclin and candidate proto-oncogene. However, the specific enzymatic activities and, hence, the precise biochemical mechanisms through which cyclins function to govern cell cycle progression remain unresolved. In the present study we have investigated the coordinate interactions between these two potentially oncogenic cyclins, cyclin-dependent protein kinase subunits (cdks) and the Rb tumor-suppressor protein. The distribution of cyclin D isoforms was modulated by serum factors in primary fetal rat lung epithelial cells. Moreover, cyclin D1 was found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in vivo and, like cyclin A, was readily phosphorylated by pp60c-src in vitro. In synchronized human osteosarcoma cells, cyclin D1 is induced in early G1 and becomes associated with p9Ckshs1, a Cdk-binding subunit. Immunoprecipitation experiments with human osteosarcoma cells and Ewing's sarcoma cells demonstrated that cyclin D1 is associated with both p34cdc2 and p33cdk2, and that cyclin D1 immune complexes exhibit appreciable histone H1 kinase activity. Immobilized, recombinant cyclins A and D1 were found to associate with cellular proteins in complexes that contain the p105Rb protein. This study identifies several common aspects of cyclin biochemistry, including tyrosine phosphorylation and the potential to interact directly or indirectly with the Rb protein, that may ultimately relate membrane-mediated signaling events to the regulation of gene expression.

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