Effect of Circumcision on Incidence of Urinary Tract Infection in Preschool Boys

J Pediatr. 1996 Jan;128(1):23-7. doi: 10.1016/s0022-3476(96)70423-7.

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether circumcision decreases the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) in boys less than 5 years of age.

Study design: A case-control study (1993 to 1995) in the setting of a large ambulatory pediatric service. Case subjects and control subjects were drawn from the same population. One hundred forty-four boys less than 5 years of age (median age, 5.8 months) who had a microbiologically proven symptomatic UTI (case subjects), were compared with 742 boys (median age, 21.0 months) who did not have a UTI (control subjects). The proportion of case and control subjects who were circumcised in each group was compared with the use of the chi-square test, with the strength of association between circumcision and UTI expressed in terms of an odds ratio. To determine whether age was a confounder or an effect-modifier, we stratified the groups by age (< 1 year; > or = 1 year) and analyzed by the method of Mantel-Haenszel.

Results: Of the 144 preschool boys with UTI, 2 (1.4%) were circumcised, compared with 47 (6.3%) of the 742 control subjects (chi-square value = 5.6; p = 0.02; odds ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence intervals, 0.06 to 0.76). There was no evidence that age was a confounder or modified the protective effect of circumcision on the development of UTI (Mantel-Haenszel chi-square value = 6.0; p = 0.01; combined odds ratio, 0.18; 95% confidence intervals, 0.05 to 0.71; Breslow-Day test of homogeneity chi-square value = 0.6; p = 0.4).

Conclusions: Circumcision decreases the risk of symptomatic UTI in preschool boys. The protective effect is independent of age.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Age Distribution
  • Age Factors
  • Australia
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Chi-Square Distribution
  • Child, Preschool
  • Circumcision, Male*
  • Colony Count, Microbial
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Odds Ratio
  • Urinary Tract Infections / prevention & control*