A Prospective Study of the Intake of Vitamins C and B6, and the Risk of Kidney Stones in Men

J Urol. 1996 Jun;155(6):1847-51.

Abstract

Purpose: The association between the intake of vitamins C and B6, and kidney stone formation was examined.

Materials and methods: We conducted a prospective study of the relationship between the intake of vitamins C and B6 and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones in a cohort of 45,251 men 40 to 75 years old with no history of kidney calculi. Vitamin intake from foods and supplements was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire completed in 1986.

Results: During 6 years of followup 751 incident cases of kidney stones were documented. Neither vitamin C nor vitamin B6 intake was significantly associated with the risk of stone formation. For vitamin C the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 1,500 mg. daily or more compared to less than 250 mg. daily was 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 1.11). For vitamin B6 the age-adjusted relative risk for men consuming 40 mg. daily or more compared to less than 3 mg. daily was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.31). After adjusting for other potential stone risk factors the relative risks did not change significantly.

Conclusions: These data do not support an association between a high daily intake of vitamin C or vitamin B6 and the risk of stone formation, even when consumed in large doses.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Ascorbic Acid / administration & dosage*
  • Ascorbic Acid / adverse effects
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diet
  • Energy Intake
  • Health Personnel
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Kidney Calculi / epidemiology*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Pyridoxine / administration & dosage*
  • Pyridoxine / adverse effects
  • Risk Factors
  • Time Factors
  • United States / epidemiology

Substances

  • Pyridoxine
  • Ascorbic Acid