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Comparative Study
, 39 (12), 929-35

T Cell Response to Borrelia Garinii, Borrelia Afzelii, and Borrelia Japonica in Various Congenic Mouse Strains

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Comparative Study

T Cell Response to Borrelia Garinii, Borrelia Afzelii, and Borrelia Japonica in Various Congenic Mouse Strains

N Ishii et al. Microbiol Immunol.

Abstract

The infectivity and T cell response to Borrelia garinii SIKA2, Borrelia afzelii BFOX, and Borrelia japonica 0612, the organisms that cause Lyme disease in Japan, were examined in various inbred and congenic strains of mice. Infectivity differed among the species: B. garinii SIKA2 and B. afzelii BFOX were each able to infect 90% to 100% of C3H/He mice; B. japonica 0612 was able to infect only 20% of C3H/He mice. The pattern of infectivity to various inbred and congenic strains of mice may influence the pathogenicity of the organism and the clinical signs of Lyme disease. Cross-reactivity between Borrelia antigens was observed, but there was no cross-reactivity between Borrelia antigens and Leptospira antigens. We evaluated the genetic control of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in the form of footpad swelling produced by Borrelia antigens using viable or sonicated bacteria as sensitization. Differences in strains of mice infected by viable antigen were observed. However, all strains of mice showed a strong DTH reaction using sonicated antigens without genetic background. A DTH reaction in the form of footpad swelling did not appear to be associated with genetic background. The footpad reaction was mediated by CD4+8- and Ia- T cells, as revealed by in vitro monoclonal antibody treatment. However, CD8+ T cells did not suppress footpad swelling. These results indicate that many antigenic epitopes of the Borrelia spirochete can stimulate the DTH reaction.

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