Differences in the in vivo insulin secretion and sensitivity of healthy black versus white adolescents

J Pediatr. 1996 Sep;129(3):440-3. doi: 10.1016/s0022-3476(96)70078-1.

Abstract

Fourteen black and 16 white healthy adolescents underwent a 2-hour hyperglycemic clamp (12.5 mmol/L) to investigate racial differences in insulin secretion and sensitivity. First-phase and second-phase insulin concentrations were higher in black subjects than in white subjects (first phase: 944 +/- 110 pmol/L vs. 462 +/- 52 pmol/L, p = 0.0003; second phase: 1050 +/- 146 pmol/L vs. 652 +/- 53 pmol/L, p = 0.0012). The insulin sensitivity index was lower in black adolescents (8.21 +/- 1.05) compared with white adolescents (12.55 +/- 1.42 mumol/kg per minute per picomole per liter, p = 0.02). These findings indicate that significant differences in insulin secretion and sensitivity are detectable in healthy black versus white adolescents.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • African Continental Ancestry Group*
  • Blood Glucose
  • Child
  • European Continental Ancestry Group*
  • Glucose Clamp Technique
  • Humans
  • Insulin / metabolism*
  • Insulin Resistance*
  • Insulin Secretion
  • Reference Values

Substances

  • Blood Glucose
  • Insulin