Seven-year trends in plasma low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol in young adults: the CARDIA Study

Ann Epidemiol. 1996 May;6(3):235-45. doi: 10.1016/1047-2797(96)00005-1.

Abstract

To identify determinants of recent secular trends in lipids and characterize their influence on age-related increases in LDL-cholesterol, we examined a cohort of black and white men and women aged 18-30 in 1985-1986. Secular trends were determined by comparing participants aged 25-30 at baseline with those aged 25-30 at year 7 (2788 and 1395 participants, respectively). LDL-cholesterol was lower among those 25-30 at year 7 (5.9 to 10.2 mg/dL, depending on race-sex group; P < 0.001); weight was higher (8.3 to 12.5 lb; P < 0.001); Keys score was lower (-4.2 to -7.3 units; P < 0.001); and use of oral contraceptives was greater (white women only, P < 0.01). Among 4086 participants followed for 7 years, LDL-cholesterol changed little or decreased, despite substantial weight increases in all groups (11.6 to 19.0 lb; P < 0.001). Keys scores decreased by 6.1 to 8.0 units, and use of oral contraceptives decreased (P < 0.001). Declining secular trends in LDL-cholesterol occurred despite upward trends in weight; the decline was associated with lower dietary fat and cholesterol and offset expected age-related increases in LDL-cholesterol.

Publication types

  • Multicenter Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans
  • Body Mass Index
  • Cholesterol / blood
  • Cholesterol, HDL / blood
  • Cholesterol, LDL / adverse effects
  • Cholesterol, LDL / blood*
  • Cohort Effect
  • Diet
  • Educational Status
  • European Continental Ancestry Group
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Life Style
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Prospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Sex Factors
  • Triglycerides / blood
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Weight Gain

Substances

  • Cholesterol, HDL
  • Cholesterol, LDL
  • Triglycerides
  • Cholesterol