Cough threshold for capsaicin increases by azelastine in patients with cough-variant asthma

Pulm Pharmacol. 1996 Feb;9(1):59-62. doi: 10.1006/pulp.1996.0007.

Abstract

To assess the effects of azelastine in patients with cough-variant asthma, we measured the cough threshold for capsaicin (the concentration required to elicit more than five coughs) in 16 patients with cough-variant asthma before and after 4 weeks of treatment with azelastine (2 mg; b.i.d.) or placebo. After treatment, coughing decreased in all patients and the cough threshold for capsaicin increased significantly, from 0.67 +/- 0.30 microM to 4.76 +/- 1.55 microM (P < 0.01) in the azelastine group. However, the cough threshold for capsaicin did not increase significantly, from 0.86 +/- 0.33 microM to 1.11 +/- 0.35 microM (P > 0.10) in the placebo group. These results suggest that azelastine inhibits coughing in patients with cough-variant asthma.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Controlled Clinical Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Asthma / complications*
  • Bronchodilator Agents / pharmacology*
  • Capsaicin / adverse effects*
  • Cough / chemically induced*
  • Cough / prevention & control
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Female
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists / pharmacology*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Phthalazines / therapeutic use*

Substances

  • Bronchodilator Agents
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists
  • Phthalazines
  • Capsaicin
  • azelastine