Self-hypnotic relaxation during interventional radiological procedures: effects on pain perception and intravenous drug use

Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 1996 Apr;44(2):106-19. doi: 10.1080/00207149608416074.

Abstract

The authors evaluated whether self-hypnotic relaxation can reduce the need for intravenous conscious sedation during interventional radiological procedures. Sixteen patients were randomized to a test group, and 14 patients were randomized to a control group. All had patient-controlled analgesia. Test patients additionally had self-hypnotic relaxation and underwent a Hypnotic Induction Profile test. Compared to controls, test patients used less drugs (0.28 vs. 2.01 drug units; p < .01) and reported less pain (median pain rating 2 vs. 5 on a 0-10 scale; p < .01). Significantly more control patients exhibited oxygen desaturation and/or needed interruptions of their procedures for hemodynamic instability. Benefit did not correlate with hypnotizability. Self-hypnotic relaxation can reduce drug use and improve procedural safety.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Anxiety / etiology
  • Anxiety / therapy
  • Conscious Sedation*
  • Humans
  • Hypnosis*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pain / psychology*
  • Prospective Studies
  • Radiology, Interventional / methods*
  • Relaxation Therapy*