Detection by PCR of human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical lesions of Senegalese women

J Med Virol. 1996 Aug;49(4):259-63. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1096-9071(199608)49:4<259::AID-JMV1>3.0.CO;2-2.

Abstract

In order to analyse human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the Senegalese population, HPV DNA was sought in 65 women with evidence of cervical cytological abnormality and in 72 pregnant women. Ninety-four percent of the patients were positive for HPV DNA as compared to 24% of pregnant women. HPV 16 was detected in cervical smears in 42% of cases, HPV 18 in 39%, HPV 6 in 26%, HPV 11 in 15%, HPV 45 in 10%, HPV 52 in 3%, and HPV 31, HPV 33 and HPV 68 in 1.5%. HPV 16 and HPV 18 were detected in 16% and 7% respectively of pregnant women. HPV DNA of unknown type was detected in 6% of cases, and multiple HPV infections were observed in 28% of cases. Low risk genital HPVs (6/11) were detected in smaller proportions (17%) among high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) than the low grade SILs (43%). High risk HPVs (16/18) were detected in high proportions both in low and high grade SIL lesions, though the highest frequency (70%) was observed among patients with high grade lesions. In conclusion, the results confirm that HPV infections are frequent in Senegal and that HPV 18 and 45 are detected in a high proportion of patients in Africa.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Cervix Uteri / pathology
  • Cervix Uteri / virology*
  • DNA, Viral / analysis*
  • Female
  • Genotype
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Oncogene Proteins, Viral / genetics*
  • Papillomaviridae / genetics
  • Papillomaviridae / isolation & purification*
  • Papillomavirus Infections / pathology
  • Papillomavirus Infections / virology*
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods*
  • Pregnancy
  • Risk Factors
  • Senegal
  • Tumor Virus Infections / pathology
  • Tumor Virus Infections / virology*
  • Vaginal Smears

Substances

  • DNA, Viral
  • Oncogene Proteins, Viral