Efficacy and safety of triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1996 Oct;77(4):277-81. doi: 10.1016/S1081-1206(10)63320-0.

Abstract

Background: In order to accommodate increasing patient preferences a new aqueous formulation of triamcinolone acetonide nasal spray was developed for the relief of symptoms associated with seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis.

Objective: This multicenter, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of once-daily triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray (220 micrograms/day) with placebo in relieving the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis due to ragweed.

Methods: One hundred forty patients received either a once daily 220-microgram dose of triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray or placebo for 2 weeks. Patients evaluated the severity of seasonal allergic rhinitis symptoms daily for 2 weeks according to a 4-point scale (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe). Physician and patient global evaluations of overall treatment effectiveness were assessed at the end of the treatment period.

Results: Patients receiving triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray, 220 micrograms/day, had significantly (P < .05) greater improvements in all rhinitis symptoms at weeks 1 and 2 and overall for the 2-week treatment period compared with the placebo group. A significant (P = .006) improvement in the nasal index occurred as early as 12 hours after the first dose of triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray. Both patients and physicians reported a greater overall improvement in symptoms for the triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray group. There were no differences between the two treatment groups in the incidence of adverse events.

Conclusions: This study confirmed that a 220-microgram dose of triamcinolone acetonide aqueous nasal spray, administered once daily for 2 weeks, is well tolerated and reduces effectively the severity of symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis due to ragweed.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Controlled Clinical Trial
  • Multicenter Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Administration, Intranasal
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Drug Administration Schedule
  • Drug Tolerance
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal / drug therapy*
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide / administration & dosage*
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide / adverse effects
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide / therapeutic use

Substances

  • Triamcinolone Acetonide