Diabetes prevalence rates among First Nations adults on Saskatchewan reserves in 1990: comparison by tribal grouping, geography and with non-First Nations people

Can J Public Health. Sep-Oct 1996;87(5):325-8.

Abstract

Objective: To determine age-specific, sex-specific and total prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus among Saskatchewan First Nations adults and to compare these rates by tribal grouping, geography and with non-First Nations people.

Design: A point prevalence study of all Saskatchewan reserves in 1990.

Results: Age-adjusted rates of diabetes mellitus were higher (risk ratio 1.8) among First Nations adults (9.7%) than among non-First Nations adults (6.1%). These racial differences were greater between women (12.1 vs 6.6%) than men (7.2 vs 5.6%). First Nations diabetes rates were highest among individuals with Saulteaux and Sioux ancestry, and among those living on southern reserves.

Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among Saskatchewan First Nations people has increased from 0% to almost 10% within the adult population since 1934 and has more than doubled from 1980 to 1990. This epidemic manifests itself to a greater extent among women and certain tribal groups, possibly due to differences in exposure to non-traditional lifestyles.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Aged
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Diabetes Mellitus / ethnology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Indians, North American*
  • Life Style
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Residence Characteristics
  • Saskatchewan / epidemiology
  • Sex Distribution