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, 313 (7070), 1450-3

The Anti-Tobacco Campaign of the Nazis: A Little Known Aspect of Public Health in Germany, 1933-45

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The Anti-Tobacco Campaign of the Nazis: A Little Known Aspect of Public Health in Germany, 1933-45

R N Proctor. BMJ.

Abstract

Historians and epidemiologists have only recently begun to explore the Nazi anti-tobacco movement. Germany had the world's strongest antismoking movement in the 1930s and early 1940s, encompassing bans on smoking in public spaces, bans on advertising, restrictions on tobacco rations for women, and the world's most refined tobacco epidemiology, linking tobacco use with the already evident epidemic of lung cancer. The anti-tobacco campaign must be understood against the backdrop of the Nazi quest for racial and bodily purity, which also motivated many other public health efforts of the era.

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References

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