The Essential Role of Hippocampal CA1 NMDA Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in Spatial Memory

Cell. 1996 Dec 27;87(7):1327-38. doi: 10.1016/s0092-8674(00)81827-9.

Abstract

We have produced a mouse strain in which the deletion of the NMDAR1 gene is restricted to the CA1 pyramidal cells of the hippocampus by using a new and general method that allows CA1-restricted gene knockout. The mutant mice grow into adulthood without obvious abnormalities. Adult mice lack NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents and long-term potentiation in the CA1 synapses and exhibit impaired spatial memory but unimpaired nonspatial learning. Our results strongly suggest that activity-dependent modifications of CA1 synapses, mediated by NMDA receptors, play an essential role in the acquisition of spatial memories.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Behavior, Animal / physiology
  • Dentate Gyrus / physiology
  • Genetic Engineering / methods
  • Genetic Vectors
  • Hippocampus / physiology*
  • In Situ Hybridization
  • Long-Term Potentiation
  • Memory / physiology*
  • Mice
  • Mice, Knockout
  • Neuronal Plasticity / physiology*
  • Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate / physiology*
  • Synaptic Transmission

Substances

  • Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate