Growth hormone treatment of short children born small for gestational age or with Silver-Russell syndrome: results from KIGS (Kabi International Growth Study), including the first report on final height

Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1996 Oct;417:18-26. doi: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.1996.tb14288.x.

Abstract

The response to growth hormone (GH) therapy was studied in children born small for gestational age (SGA; n = 593) and in those with Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS; n = 127) using data from KIGS (Kabi International Growth Study). For the SGA patients, median birth weight was -2.6 SD scores (SDS), treatment was started at a median age of 9.2 years, at a time when median height was -2.8 SDS while median target height was -1.4 SDS. For the SRS patients, median birth weight was -3.1 SDS, treatment was started at a median age of 7.0 years, at a time when median height was -3.4 SDS with a median target height of -0.1 SDS. GH treatment increased height SDS in both SGA children and patients with SRS; in 16 SGA patients treated to (near) final height with GH (median dose, 0.7 IU/kg/week), height minus target height SDS was -2.0 at the start of treatment and -1.0 at final height. In conclusion, the results obtained in KIGS indicate that GH treatment of short children born SGA is effective in increasing final height above the predicted height and in achieving the target height.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial

MeSH terms

  • Abnormalities, Multiple / drug therapy
  • Adolescent
  • Birth Weight
  • Body Height / drug effects*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Dwarfism / drug therapy
  • Female
  • Human Growth Hormone / therapeutic use*
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Small for Gestational Age / physiology*
  • Male
  • Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use

Substances

  • Recombinant Proteins
  • Human Growth Hormone