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Review
. 1997 Mar;27(2):199-222.
doi: 10.3109/10408449709021619.

Genetic Polymorphisms in Human Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Potential Uses of Reverse Genetics to Identify Genes of Toxicological Relevance

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Review

Genetic Polymorphisms in Human Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Potential Uses of Reverse Genetics to Identify Genes of Toxicological Relevance

A Puga et al. Crit Rev Toxicol. .

Abstract

The human mind was engaged with fundamental questions on the nature of heredity long before the study of genetics became a scientific discipline. Many traits, such as height, eye color, blood pressure, or cancer susceptibility, have been known to run in families, although the genes or combination of genes that underlie these observable characteristics remain unknown in most cases. Differences in susceptibility to environmental agents in humans are likewise determined by variations in genetic background--genetic polymorphisms. In this article, we review the current status of studies on human polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes and discuss various approaches to the analysis of genetic polymorphisms. We expect that in the near future, novel methods in genetic analysis of human populations will be likely to play a key role in the identification of genes of toxicological relevance.

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