Barriers and facilitators to seniors' independence. Perceptions of seniors, caregivers, and health care providers

Can Fam Physician. 1997 Mar;43:469-75.

Abstract

Objective: To identify barriers and facilitators to independence as perceived by seniors with chronic health problems and their caregivers. In particular, researchers sought insights into seniors' experience of medical, home-based, and public health services.

Design: This study used the qualitative method of focus groups.

Setting: London, Ont, and surrounding area.

Participants: Seniors with chronic health problems and informal and formal caregivers were purposefully selected to participate.

Method: Seven focus groups composed of seniors, informal caregivers, and health care providers representing each of the three primary care areas (medical, home-based, and public health) explored the barriers and facilitators to seniors' independence.

Main findings: Four main themes characterized the barriers and facilitators to seniors' independence: attitudes and attributes, service accessibility, communication and coordination, and continuity of care.

Conclusions: Knowledge of barriers and facilitators to seniors' independence in the context of the health care system provides insight into how seniors can be empowered to remain independent. Health care providers need to communicate better, to foster more positive attitudes toward aging, and to participate in refining service access, coordination of services, and continuity of care.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Activities of Daily Living*
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Attitude of Health Personnel*
  • Attitude to Health*
  • Chronic Disease
  • Communication
  • Continuity of Patient Care
  • Female
  • Focus Groups
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
  • Health Services Accessibility*
  • Health Services for the Aged*
  • Home Care Services
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Ontario