Maternal attentiveness of cocaine abusers during child-based assessments

Am J Addict. Spring 1997;6(2):135-43.

Abstract

Cocaine-abusing mothers were compared with non-cocaine-using mothers on videotaped ratings of attentiveness to their children during developmental assessments done at age 3 months (n = 64), 6 months (n = 80), 12 months (n = 90), and 18 months (n = 53). At the 3-month assessment only, cocaine-abusing women spent a lower percentage of time being attentive and made more shifts in attentiveness than did control-group mothers. These differences were not found at 6-, 12-, or 18-month assessments. Maternal attentiveness appears to be more strongly related to current depression symptoms than addiction severity in the cocaine-abusing group.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Attention / drug effects*
  • Cocaine*
  • Depression / psychology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Maternal Behavior / drug effects*
  • Maternal Behavior / psychology
  • Mother-Child Relations
  • Opioid-Related Disorders / psychology
  • Substance-Related Disorders / psychology*

Substances

  • Cocaine