Efficacy of ototopical ciprofloxacin in pediatric patients with otorrhea

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1997 Apr;116(4):450-3. doi: 10.1016/s0194-5998(97)70293-6.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical ciprofloxacin in patients with recurrent otorrhea that was unresponsive to other antibiotics.

Methods: Pediatric patients with otorrhea and confirmed Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the ear fluid were enrolled. Topical ciprofloxacin, three drops three times daily for 14 days, was prescribed with aural care. Efficacy and safety were evaluated on days 7 and 14. A phone follow-up was conducted monthly thereafter for 8.6 months.

Results: Twenty-nine pediatric patients were enrolled. On day 14, 18 were cured, 8 were improved, 2 were changed to an alternate therapy and cured, and 1 showed no improvement, perhaps due to a small external ear canal. Two additional patients were cured at day 21. None of the patients reported any adverse effects. Twelve patients had no recurrence at 3 to 15 months after the study.

Conclusion: The use of topical ciprofloxacin in pediatric patients was curative in nearly 70% of patients with otorrhea associated with P. aeruginosa who were previously unresponsive to other antimicrobials. No adverse reactions were reported in the study population.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Administration, Topical
  • Adolescent
  • Anti-Infective Agents / administration & dosage
  • Anti-Infective Agents / adverse effects
  • Anti-Infective Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Ciprofloxacin / administration & dosage
  • Ciprofloxacin / adverse effects
  • Ciprofloxacin / therapeutic use*
  • Drug Resistance, Microbial
  • Evaluation Studies as Topic
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Otitis Media with Effusion / drug therapy*
  • Otitis Media with Effusion / microbiology
  • Pseudomonas Infections / drug therapy*
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa*
  • Recurrence
  • Remission Induction
  • Safety
  • Telephone

Substances

  • Anti-Infective Agents
  • Ciprofloxacin