Success of a Scabies Control Program in an Australian Aboriginal Community

Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 May;16(5):494-9. doi: 10.1097/00006454-199705000-00008.

Abstract

Objective: To adapt, implement and evaluate a model of scabies control in an Australian Aboriginal community.

Methods: After initially examining the population, we offered all residents treatment with 5% permethrin cream. Visits were made during the ensuing 25 months to rescreen and to treat new-cases of scabies and contacts.

Results: The prevalence of scabies was reduced from 28.8% before the program to < 10% during the entire period (from 32.3% to < 10% in children) (P < 0.01 for each visit). The initial prevalence of pyoderma in children was 69.4%, which was reduced and maintained at approximately one-half that rate during the last 16 months (P < 0.004 for the last 4 visits). Residual pyoderma in children was significantly less severe and no longer scabies-related.

Conclusions: This simplified model of scabies control had a substantial effect on scabies prevalence and on pyoderma prevalence and severity which was sustained for > 2 years. It could prove useful for other communities with high rates of scabies and pyoderma.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Administration, Topical
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Australia / epidemiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Disease Outbreaks / prevention & control*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Infant
  • Insecticides / administration & dosage
  • Male
  • Mass Screening*
  • Microbial Sensitivity Tests
  • Oceanic Ancestry Group*
  • Permethrin
  • Prevalence
  • Program Evaluation
  • Pyoderma / drug therapy
  • Pyoderma / ethnology*
  • Pyoderma / etiology
  • Pyrethrins / administration & dosage
  • Scabies / complications
  • Scabies / drug therapy
  • Scabies / ethnology*
  • Sex Distribution

Substances

  • Insecticides
  • Pyrethrins
  • Permethrin