Aspirin and secondary mortality after myocardial infarction

Lancet. 1979 Dec 22-29;2(8156-8157):1313-5. doi: 10.1016/s0140-6736(79)92808-3.

Abstract

A randomised controlled double-blind trial of aspirin in the prevention of death was conducted in 1682 patients (including 248 women) who had had a confirmed myocardial infarct (MI). 25% of the patients were admitted to the trial within 3 days of the infarction and 50% within 7 days. Aspirin, 300 mg three times daily, was given for 1 yr. Total mortality was 12.3% in patients given aspirin and 14.8% in those given placebo, a reduction by aspirin of 17%, which was not statistically significant at p less than 0.05. The reduction in specific ischaemic-heart-disease (IHD) mortality was 22% and in total mortality plus IHD morbidity (readmission to hospital for MI in survivors) was 28%.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aspirin / administration & dosage
  • Aspirin / adverse effects
  • Aspirin / therapeutic use*
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Death, Sudden / epidemiology*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Myocardial Infarction / mortality*
  • Patient Dropouts
  • Placebos
  • Prospective Studies
  • Research Design
  • Time Factors

Substances

  • Placebos
  • Aspirin