Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin--United States, 1997

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1997 Aug 22;46(33):765-6.

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of both hospital- and community-acquired infections worldwide, and the antimicrobial agent vancomycin has been used to treat many S. aureus infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). In 1996, the first documented case of infection caused by a strain of S. aureus with intermediate levels of resistance to vancomycin (VISA; minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]=8 microg/mL) was reported from Japan. This report describes the first isolation of VISA from a patient in the United States, which may be an early warning that S. aureus strains with full resistance to vancomycin will emerge.

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology*
  • Drug Resistance, Microbial
  • Humans
  • Microbial Sensitivity Tests
  • Peritonitis / drug therapy
  • Peritonitis / microbiology
  • Staphylococcal Infections / drug therapy*
  • Staphylococcal Infections / microbiology
  • Staphylococcus aureus / drug effects*
  • United States
  • Vancomycin / pharmacology*

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Vancomycin