Nutritional risk factors in the etiology of left displaced abomasum in dairy cows: a review

J Dairy Sci. 1997 Oct;80(10):2449-53. doi: 10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(97)76197-6.

Abstract

The transition period occurring 2 wk prepartum through 2 to 4 wk postpartum is the major risk period in the etiology of left displaced abomasum. The prepartum depression of intake and the slow postpartum increase in intake are risk factors causing lower ruminal fill, reduced forage to concentrate ratio, and increased incidence of other postpartum disorders. Uncomplicated ketosis, retained placenta, metritis, and hypocalcemia at parturition are risk factors for left displaced abomasum. Excessive amounts of concentrate during the prepartum period increase the risk of left displaced abomasum, which may occur from the lower ruminal fill caused by greater prepartum intake depression and reduced forage to concentrate ratio, decreased ruminal motility from lower ruminal fill and higher volatile fatty acid concentration, and decreased abomasal motility and emptying from higher concentrations of volatile fatty acids. Effects of volatile fatty acids on motility may be exacerbated by low ruminal absorption of volatile fatty acids during the transition period. Minimal intake of concentrate during the prepartum period may increase the risk of left displaced abomasum through failure to increase the absorptive capacity of the ruminal papillae and failure of the microbial population of the rumen to adapt prior to the intake of high energy postpartum diets. Increased risk of left displaced abomasum in cows that are hypocalcemic at parturition may be due to decreased ruminal and abomasal motility.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Abomasum*
  • Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
  • Animals
  • Body Composition
  • Cattle
  • Cattle Diseases / etiology*
  • Female
  • Puerperal Disorders / etiology
  • Puerperal Disorders / veterinary
  • Risk Factors
  • Stomach Diseases / etiology
  • Stomach Diseases / veterinary*