Bacterial Virulence in Urinary Tract Infection

Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1997 Sep;11(3):513-29. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70371-8.

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTI) are caused by a variety of gram-negative bacteria that ascend into the urinary tract and establish bacteriuria often at levels greater than or equal to 10(5) bacteria/ mL of urine. Escherichia coli dominate as the causative agent in all patient groups, with Staphylococcus saprophyticus as the second most common, accounting for about 10% to 30% of the infections in young adult women depending on the season. This article covers the pathogenesis and inflammatory response of UTI and the virulence factors of uropathogenic E. coli.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Clone Cells
  • Escherichia coli / genetics
  • Escherichia coli / metabolism
  • Escherichia coli / pathogenicity*
  • Escherichia coli Infections / immunology
  • Escherichia coli Infections / metabolism
  • Escherichia coli Infections / microbiology*
  • Female
  • Hemolysin Proteins / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Hydroxamic Acids / metabolism
  • Inflammation / microbiology
  • Lipopolysaccharides / metabolism
  • Polysaccharides, Bacterial / metabolism
  • Urinary Tract Infections / immunology
  • Urinary Tract Infections / metabolism
  • Urinary Tract Infections / microbiology*
  • Virulence

Substances

  • Hemolysin Proteins
  • Hydroxamic Acids
  • Lipopolysaccharides
  • Polysaccharides, Bacterial
  • aerobactin