Prevalence of uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity in Hispanic and non-Hispanic adults. Results from the HHANES and the NHANES I

Ophthalmology. 1998 Mar;105(3):552-60. doi: 10.1016/S0161-6420(98)93042-1.

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to provide a comparative analysis of American population-based prevalence of uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity in Hispanics and non-Hispanics.

Design: The study design was a population-based survey.

Participants: Data from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1982 and 1984 and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I from 1974 through 1975 were analyzed to investigate the epidemiology of uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity in adults 25 to 74 years of age in Cuban Americans (N = 391), Mexican Americans (N = 1350), Puerto Ricans (N = 504), African Americans (N = 245), and non-Hispanic white Americans (N = 2571).

Main outcome measure: Uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity in both eyes was assessed using Sloan letters or Landolt rings.

Results: Prevalence rates of 20/50 or worse uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity were 22%, 24%, 19%, 18%, and 32% for African Americans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and non-Hispanic whites, respectively. After adjustment for gender and age, the rates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) for non-Hispanic whites compared to each of the other ethnic groups. Significant increases in the prevalence of 20/50 or worse distance visual acuity were observed for increasing age groups (25-39, 40-59, and 60-74 years) within each gender-ethnic subgroup. Analysis of differences in prevalence by gender (controlling for age) indicated a slightly higher prevalence of 20/50 or worse distance visual acuity in women than in men (range of odds ratios, 1.1-2.1). Based on 1993 census population estimates in the United States, more than 42 million adults 25 to 74 years of age have an uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity of 20/50 or worse. Approximately 1.7 million of these adults are of Hispanic origin.

Conclusion: The prevalence of impaired uncorrected binocular distance visual acuity generally is lower in Hispanics than in non-Hispanic whites.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans* / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Hispanic or Latino* / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Prevalence
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Vision Disorders / epidemiology*
  • Vision Disorders / ethnology
  • Vision Tests
  • Vision, Binocular*
  • Visual Acuity*
  • Visually Impaired Persons / statistics & numerical data
  • Whites* / statistics & numerical data