Psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms are associated with low blood pressure in Swedish schoolchildren

Psychother Psychosom. 1998;67(2):88-93. doi: 10.1159/000012265.

Abstract

Background: The relation between psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms and blood pressure was studied in Swedish schoolchildren.

Methods: Blood pressure was measured in 122 healthy Swedish schoolchildren, aged 6-16 years. Psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms, delinquent behaviour, parental health and employment status were assessed.

Results: Children with systolic blood pressure above + 1 SD of mean reported significantly less symptoms (x = 1.4) than children with blood pressure below -1 SD of the mean (x = 2.7; p < 0.05). Children with three or more self-reported symptoms had significantly lower blood pressure than children without symptoms both in the supine (110 +/- 12 vs. 120 +/- 18 mm Hg; p < 0.05) and in the standing position (117 +/- 17 vs. 127 +/- 18 mm Hg; p < 0.05).

Conclusions: We conclude that psychosomatic and psychosocial symptoms in children might be associated with low blood pressure.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Blood Pressure / physiology*
  • Chi-Square Distribution
  • Child
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Family Health
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Juvenile Delinquency / statistics & numerical data*
  • Male
  • Psychophysiologic Disorders / epidemiology
  • Psychophysiologic Disorders / physiopathology*
  • Somatoform Disorders / epidemiology
  • Somatoform Disorders / physiopathology*
  • Sweden / epidemiology