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, 46 (5), 577-82

The Sequelae of Hospitalization for Ischemic Stroke Among Older Adults

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The Sequelae of Hospitalization for Ischemic Stroke Among Older Adults

F D Wolinsky et al. J Am Geriatr Soc.

Abstract

Objectives: To estimate the independent effect of hospitalization for ischemic stroke on change in functional status, subsequent hospitalization, and mortality.

Design: Secondary analysis of the nationally representative Longitudinal Study on Aging. Baseline (1984) interview data were linked to Medicare hospitalization and death records for 1984-1991 and to functional status reports at three biennial follow-ups.

Setting: In-person and telephone interviews were conducted.

Participants: A total of 6071 noninstitutionalized respondents 70 years old or older at baseline.

Measurements: Hospitalization for ischemic stroke was defined as having one or more episodes with primary discharge ICD9-CM codes of 433.0-434.9, 436, and 437.0-437.1. Two reference groups were used: those who were hospitalized for something other than stroke, and those who were not hospitalized at all. The statistical methods employed were multivariable proportional hazards, logistic, and linear regression.

Results: The adjusted hazards ratio for having a primary hospital discharge diagnosis of ischemic stroke on mortality was 7.57 (CI95% = 6.47 to 8.85) versus 3.67 (CI95% = 3.28 to 4.10) for having been hospitalized for something other than stroke (both compared with the reference category of those not hospitalized at all). The adjusted odds ratio for having any subsequent hospitalization associated with having a primary hospital discharge diagnosis of ischemic stroke (compared with having been hospitalized for something other than stroke) was not significantly elevated (AOR = 1.16; CI95% = .94 to 1.42). However, the percent increases in the subsequent number of hospital episodes, total charges, and total length of stay for those who were hospitalized for ischemic stroke relative to those hospitalized for something other than stroke were significant (P < .001), and ranged from 16.3 to 39.0%. Hospitalization for ischemic stroke was also related significantly to greater increases in the regression-adjusted mean number of instrumental activities of daily living and lower body function limitations at follow-up.

Conclusion: Hospitalization for ischemic stroke among older adults substantially increases the risk of subsequent mortality, the volume of hospital resource consumption, and greater functional decline, even when compared with hospitalization for something other than stroke. Therefore, greater attention to the prevention and management of ischemic stroke is needed.

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