Magnetic fields and breast cancer in Swedish adults residing near high-voltage power lines

Epidemiology. 1998 Jul;9(4):392-7.

Abstract

We conducted a case-control study to test the hypothesis that residential magnetic field exposures increase the incidence of breast cancer. The study was based on people who had lived within 300 m of 220- or 400-kV power lines in Sweden at any time between 1960 and 1985. We identified 699 cases of breast cancer in women and 9 cases in men. One matched control per female case and eight per male case were selected at random. Estrogen receptor information was available for a subset of female cases. We assessed magnetic field exposure through calculations of the magnetic fields generated by the power lines before diagnosis. For calculated magnetic field levels > or = 0.2 microtesla (microT) closest in times before diagnosis, we estimated the relative risk to be 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.7-1.5] for women and 2.1 (95% CI = 0.3-14.1) for men. Women younger than 50 years of age at diagnosis had a relative risk of 1.8 (95% CI = 0.7-4.3). For women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the relative risk was estimated at 1.6 (95% CI = 0.6-4.1), using the exposure cutoff point > or = 0.1 microT. Among estrogen receptor-positive women younger than 50 years at diagnosis, the relative risk increased to 7.4 (95% CI = 1.0-178.1).

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Breast Neoplasms / etiology
  • Breast Neoplasms / pathology
  • Breast Neoplasms, Male / epidemiology
  • Breast Neoplasms, Male / etiology
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Causality
  • Cohort Studies
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Electromagnetic Fields / adverse effects*
  • Environmental Exposure / adverse effects*
  • Environmental Exposure / analysis
  • Environmental Exposure / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / epidemiology*
  • Receptors, Estrogen / analysis
  • Residence Characteristics
  • Risk
  • Sex Distribution
  • Sweden / epidemiology

Substances

  • Receptors, Estrogen